John Ashworth bought the Springhill land and properties in 1834 from Charlotte Ann Hargreaves and probably had Springhill House built shortly afterwards
b c1778 to Richard Ashworth
m. Betty Ormerod 11 Jun 1805 St Nicholas Newchurch by License.
Both "of Whitewell Bottom". (Approx 1.5 miles from Springhill)
Witnesses Wm Lord, Lawe. Ashworth and F Bury. Wm Lord appears to have been a professional witness.

They had four children. The first three children (Elizabeth, bap 2 Nov 1806, Ormerod bap 25 May 1808, Mary Ann, bap 29 Oct 1809) were "of Whitewell Bottom" at baptism, whilst the youngest, John (bap 7 Jun 1812) was "of Cloughfold".

Ormerod died in infancy and John in early adulthood as detailed on the memorial below. Elizabeth played little part in the history of Springhill. Mary Ann inherited the Springhill estate and later married Charles Patrick.

The children of John junior, Elizabeth Ann and Mary Alice, were later to inherit John senior's estate (and other land) including land and properties at Springhill. Elizabeth Ann married Robert Charles Turner. Mary Alice married William Herbert Molyneux Royds and, following his death, John Hargreaves Law. Law is listed on the Mannex 1875 trade directory as registrar of births, marriages and deaths.

Stacks Image 75
Memorial St Nicholas' Newchurch on the right hand wall of the nave at the rear of the church.

'IN MEMORY OF JOHN ASHWORTH of Cloughfold,
who died March 25th 1850 aged 72 years
and BETTY his wife,
who died September 24th 1845 aged 76 years.

also JOHN ASHWORTH son of the above
who died August 15th 1846, aged 34 years
also MARY his wife,
who died May 28th 1851, aged 37 years
and JOHN HOWARTH their son,
who died June 12th 1844, aged 4 years and 3 months

"Enter thou into the joy of thy Lord'"

Erected by the surviving daughters of John and Betty Ashworth

(link to enlargement of text)

John Ashworth's will is complex (not helped by being written without punctuation) and some portions are illegible. It outlines his family relationships (which form the basis of the decendency chart), his interest in the turnpike and coal mines, the land he held and from whom he obtained it and even his pew in St Nicholas.

Interestingly John Ashworth signed his will with a mark. Was he illiterate or too ill to sign? It would be unusual for someone with his business interests to be illiterate at that time, yet it is a remarkably complex and detailed document for someone too ill to sign his name. The parish register transcripts also suggest that he signed his marriage register.